Programme



Twentieth Anniversary Summer Session of SLS

Sunday 5 to Wednesday 15 August 2018

Preliminary Draft Academic Programme

Draft title: ‘Towards an Effective International Criminal Justice System in the Era of The Permanent International Criminal Court – Coordinating and Strengthening Enforcement on National, Regional, and International Levels’

2018 is a year of plenty notable international (criminal) law events to commemorate. 400 years ago, the defenestration of Prague provoked the Bohemian revolt and the outbreak of the Thirty Years’ War; 100 years ago, the treaty of Brest-Litovsk concluded Russia’s participation in World War I and the Armistice of Compiègne ended fighting on the Western Front; 75 years ago, the Warsaw Ghetto uprising marks the largest and symbolically most important Jewish uprising in German-occupied Europe; 70 years ago, the International Military Tribunal for the Far East delivered its judgment against major war criminals; 25 years ago, United Nations Security Council Resolution 827 established the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia; 20 years ago, the United Nations Diplomatic Conference of Plenipotentiaries on the Establishment of an International Criminal Court adopted the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court. One year later, the Salzburg Law School on International Criminal Law, Humanitarian Law and Human Rights Law (SLS) held its inaugural summer session.

For 2018, SLS proudly announces its Twentieth Anniversary Summer Session, Sunday 5 to Wednesday 15 August 2018, which will focus on international criminal law enforcement.

Gilbert Bitti and Eleni Chaitidou at SLS 2014
Gilbert Bitti and Eleni Chaitidou at SLS 2014

SLS 2018 will have a look at the enforcement of international criminal law by various judicial and quasi-judicial mechanisms. When the Statute of the International Criminal Court was adopted in Rome in 1998, hopes were high that the complementarity regime with the ICC at its center would be the adequate tool to close the impunity gap. 15 years later, it has crystallized that states have not yet lived up to their primary duty to exercise their criminal jurisdiction over those responsible for international crimes. On international level, the ICC faces limitations e.g. in terms of jurisdiction and resources. Despite efforts over the years, the Security Council has failed to refer the situation in Syria to the ICC.

At its Twentieth Anniversary Summer Session, SLS will discuss the different generations of international courts and tribunals: From the post World War II military tribunals to the ad hoc and hybrid tribunals of the 1990s and the ICC. In addition, we will cover latest developments such as the regional criminal chambers at the African Court of Justice and Human Rights, the Kosovo Specialist Chambers, and the International, Impartial and Independent Mechanism on international crimes committed in the Syrian Arab Republic.

We plan to analyse efforts to enhance effectiveness by various actors. These are, on national level, the implementation of crimes under international law in domestic criminal codes as well as the strengthening of international cooperation for these crimes, by means such as the draft Convention on Crimes Against Humanity and the initiative for a Mutual Legal Assistance Treaty for Core Crimes. On international level, e.g. performance indicators and the institutional reform at the ICC as well as campaigns for self-restraint of the Security Council's veto powers in face of mass atrocities can be named.

With multiple actors within a global system of international criminal justice, coordination becomes paramount. SLS 2018 will analyse concepts such as complementarity and primacy and assess their value as structuring elements but also gauge their strength in delivering international criminal justice.

Luis Moreno Ocampo, David Donat Cattin, Otto Triffterer, and Chris Hall at SLS 2008
Luis Moreno Ocampo, David Donat Cattin, Otto Triffterer, and Chris Hall at SLS 2008

SLS 2018 will offer ample opportunity to debate current developments in the field of international criminal law, e.g. the principle of irrelevance of official capacity and the impact of three withdrawals (followed by two withdrawals of the respective notification of withdrawal) by African members States on the future of international criminal justice. Court officials will give an update on the latest jurisprudence of the ICC and we will continue our project on international criminal law in cinema.

Details on the academic programme and a provisional list of speakers will be available in February 2018. Applications are welcome at any time, latest until mid-April 2018.

The academic programme will last from Monday 6 August through Tuesday 14 August, daily from 9.30 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 2.15 p.m. to 5.45 p.m. with a free Saturday afternoon and Sunday. Sunday 5 August and Wednesday 15 August will be our days of arrival and departure respectively. During these eight working days, 26 academic sessions of 1,5 hrs are offered (equalling 52 academic contact hours in total). The course consists of lectures, discussions, workshops and case studies, allowing for discussion and interaction among lecturers and participants. It will be held at the Faculty of Law of the University of Salzburg, located at a 16th century residence in the centre of the old town.

Participants will obtain a certificate of attendance, but may also take an exam, for which the University of Salzburg allocates 4 credits according to the European Credit Transfer System.

View Past SLS Programmes